Artforum April 2014

| April 2, 2014 | 0 Comments

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Artforum April 2014This month in Artforum:

J. Hoberman looks through the peerless lens of Michael Snow:

“Snow’s strongest pieces are perceptual. What you see is what you get.”
—J. Hoberman

“Shock Value”: As a major survey of the work of Sigmar Polke opens this month at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, scholar Christine Mehring uncovers the history of the legendary artist’s controversial 1976 retrospective in Düsseldorf:

“Polke posed an uncomfortable question: How far had Germany truly come since wreaking havoc on modern art?”
—Christine Mehring

Renowned curator René Block talks about his seminal role in the development of the postwar movement with which Polke, Gerhard Richter, and others got their starts:

“For me, Capitalist Realism was quite simply a brand, not a style—not an ideology.”
—René Block

“Toward an Architecture of Enjoyment”: Artforum unearths a forgotten 1973 manuscript by Henri Lefebvre—the legendary theorist of urbanism, culture, and everyday life—with an introduction by scholar Łukasz Stanek:

“The monumental was rich from every point of view: rich with meaning, the sensible expression of richness. These meanings died over the course of the century.”
—Henri Lefebvre

1000 Words: Steven Holl and Martin Boyce talk about their new collaboration at the Glasgow School of Art:

“Martin’s piece is fundamentally connected to the building. It becomes part of the philosophical ground of the architecture.”
—Steven Holl

· Also: Jorge Otero-Pailos and Julian Rose take on the proposed MoMA expansion and the conundrums of architectural preservation; Simon Baier visits Lutz Bacher at Kunsthalle Zürich; Beau Rutland introduces an Openings on Marina Pinsky; Lars Bang Larsen buys into Superflex; Jim Fletcher rereads Semiotext(e)‘s collected volume Schizo-Culture; James Quandt probes Lav Diaz‘s latest crime drama, Norte, the End of History; and Thierry de Duve unpacks the sentence that changed modern art forever, in the final installment of his series on the avant-garde for Artforum.

· Plus: David Rimanelli plays analysand to Laurence Rickels‘s examination of James Bond and Ian Fleming; Amy Taubin watches Mireia Sallarés‘s Little Deaths; and musician Pauline Oliveros counts down her Top Ten.

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Category: Fine Art

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